Sleep & Weight Gain

Did you know that getting the proper amount of sleep every night is an effective way to keep off excess weight? Studies found in this article from the National Center for Biotechnology Information show that people who get less sleep have a more difficult time losing weight than those who get adequate and restful sleep.

The idea is that our bodies know when we should be sleeping thanks to circadian rhythms, or biological processes that operate on a 24-hour cycle and correspond roughly with our environmental cycles like light and dark. These circadian processes regulate a number of things in our bodies, including appetite-regulating hormones like ghrelin and leptin production.

When our sleep cycles are shortened, it can lead to symptoms like higher average blood pressure and increased production and excretion of norepinephrine, which causes the heart to contract more often. When you have higher average blood pressure and a heart that contracts more often than it should, it can lead to increased incidences of hypertension, which can then lead to unwanted weight gain.

At 1513 Anti-Aging & Weight Loss®, we always want to ensure that our clients are educated on the things they can do to help improve their success in reaching their weight loss goals. If you feel like you are not getting a restful evening’s sleep, it may be a symptom of hormone deficiency. Get your blood drawn and tested for hormone balance if you experience:

  • Unusual weight gain
  • Excess fatigue and exhaustion
  • Decrease in stamina or strength
  • Sleeplessness or insomnia

One of the best ways to lose weight and keep it off is to ensure that you are getting a full night of restful sleep. Doctors typically recommend 6 – 8 hours of sleep per night for adults, but individuals may require more or less depending on a number of factors. If you find that you are constantly tired and are not getting enough sleep, 1513 may be able to help get your hormones and your life in balance. Contact us today at (706) 801-4132 for more information on our hormone replacement therapy for men and women.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2831987/